Hotel Front

Historic Buildings & Sites

There are many Historic Houses and Sites within easy reach of the Millstream

Holy Trinity Church, Bosham (0.5 miles)

The church of The Holy Trinity, Bosham, is one of the earliest churches in Sussex and there is documented evidence to show that there was a small Christian community in Bosham in the 7th century, making it the oldest site of Christianity in Sussex. One of its most famous features is the 11th century chancel arch generally believed to have been built shortly after the Norman Conquest of 1066.  The Saxon tower is the oldest part of the church and stands out as a landmark for sailors as it has done for many centuries. http://www.boshamchurch.org.uk/

Fishbourne Roman Palace (3 miles)

Fishbourne Roman Palace was discovered by accident during the digging of a water main trench in 1960. The discovery led to nine seasons of excavations that showed the site had developed from a military base at the time of the Roman invasion in AD43 to a sumptuous Palace by the end of the first century. This story is told in an entertaining audio-visual programme and also in the site museum, with the addition of fascinating artefacts from the excavations along with plans, reconstruction drawings and models. The remains of the North Wing of the Palace are enclosed within a cover building for their protection and for the comfort of the visitors. Here can be seen the largest collection of in-situ mosaics in Britain including the famous Cupid on a Dolphin mosaic. Outside, the northern half of the formal garden has been replanted to its original plan as recovered by excavation. An attractive plant display area contains a range of plants known to have been cultivated by the Romans. Adjacent to it is a Roman Garden Museum which includes a reconstructed Roman potting shed with a selection of horticultural tools. http://www.sussexpast.co.uk/property/site.php?site_id=11

Chichester Cathedral (4 miles)

Chichester Cathedral has fine architecture in both the Norman and the Gothic styles. It has two architectural features that are unique among England’s medieval cathedrals—a free-standing medieval bell tower and double aisles. The cathedral contains two rare medieval sculptures, and many modern art works including tapestries, stained glass and sculpture. http://www.chichestercathedral.org.uk/

Goodwood House (8 miles)

Nestled at the foot of the South Downs and home to The Earl and Countess of March, Goodwood House combines the glamour of a great English country house with the warmth of a family home. Discover a historic world of beauty and comfort. http://www.goodwood.co.uk/goodwood-house/goodwood-house.aspx

Stansted House (9 miles)

Stansted House, near Rowlands Cstle, is an Edwardian ‘upstairs-downstairs’  house in 1800 acres of ancient forest. It overlooks the coast from the South Downs, on the borders of Hampshire and Sussex. The  House, chapel, state rooms and the fully furnished servants’ quarters are open from April to September. http://www.stanstedpark.co.uk/

Uppark – National Trust (12 miles)

This gem on the South Downs, rescued after a major fire in 1989, houses an elegant Georgian interior with a famous Grand Tour collection, which includes paintings, furniture and ceramics. An 18th-century dolls’ house with original contents, is one of the highlights. The complete servants’ quarters in the basement are shown as they were in Victorian days when H. G. Wells’ mother was housekeeper. The beautiful and peaceful garden is now fully restored in the early 19th-century Picturesque style, in a downland and woodland setting. http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-vh/w-visits/w-findaplace/w-uppark/

Cowdray (15 miles)

Cowdray is a Historic Tudor House set in Midhurst, West Sussex. Cowdray is one of England’s most important early Tudor houses. This visitor attraction, visited by Queen Elizabeth I and King Henry VIII, was partially destroyed by fire in 1793. Its magnificent ruins are set in the stunning landscape of Cowdray Park, in the heart of the South Downs National Park. Cowdray plays host to special events throughout the season, including outdoor theatre and period re-enactments. http://www.cowdray.org.uk/

Arundel Castle (16 miles)

The seat of The Dukes of Norfolk and set in 40 acres of sweeping grounds and gardens, Arundel Castle has been open to visitors seasonally for nearly 200 years. It is one of the great treasure houses of England, each having its own unique place in history and is home to priceless works of art. Come and see paintings and furniture, tapestries and stained glass, china and clocks, sculpture and carving, heraldry and armour in stunning room settings. http://www.arundelcastle.org/_pages/03_visitor_info.htm

Bignor Roman Villa (19 miles)

Bignor Roman Villa is the stunning remains of a Roman home and farm with world-class mosaic floors in a spectacular Downland setting. Learn why the Roman owners chose to develop such a magnificent settlement at Bignor in the 3rd Century AD and how they acquired wealth from its location. Outside the Roman Villa, walk through the beautiful Nyetimber vineyard and explore the endless footpaths and stunning villages in the heart of the newly designated South Downs National Park. http://www.bignorromanvilla.co.uk/

Petworth House – National Trust (20 miles)

The vast late 17th-century mansion is set in a beautiful 283-hectare (700-acre) deer park, landscaped by ‘Capability’ Brown and immortalised in Turner’s paintings. The house contains the National Trust’s finest collection of pictures, with numerous works by Turner, Van Dyck, Reynolds and Blake, ancient and Neo-classical sculpture, fine furniture and carvings by Grinling Gibbons. The servants’ quarters contain fascinating kitchens (including a copper batterie de cuisine of more than 1,000 pieces) and other service rooms. On weekdays additional rooms in the house are open by kind permission of Lord and Lady Egremont. http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-vh/w-visits/w-findaplace/w-petworthhouse/

Parham House (21 miles)

Parham House has always been a well-loved family home, and only three families have lived here since its foundation stone was laid in 1577 during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.  Parham’s tranquillity and timeless beauty have changed little over the centuries. Parham House and Gardens are now owned by a Charitable Trust. http://www.parhaminsussex.co.uk/